Agriculture Education

the first step to self-sufficiency and an improved livelihood

THE CHALLENGE

Subsistence farmers in Africa continue to struggle to survive due to a very dire set of circumstances which is beyond their control. A lack of agricultural extension services by the government, small landholdings, soil erosion, overused and infertile soils, erratic rainfall patterns due to climate change, lack of access to quality seeds, little crop variety, lack of knowledge of effective farming techniques and rudimentary tools have resulted in very low agricultural yields, which leads to food insecurity throughout the year.

Lack of access to clean and safe water also greatly contributes to this desolate situation, which has disastrous effects on the general health and productivity of the population. Especially children are severely affected by malnutrition and stunting, which are at high levels (25 to 32% in the areas where we are active). These adverse conditions affect bodily functions and lead to a vicious cycle of medical, economic and social problems.


OUR APPROACH

SOFDI has developed a holistic approach which counteracts the above-mentioned problems. As a first step toward improving the existing situation, SOFDI gives farmers access to clean water through spring protection (see WATER PROJECTS). This also serves as an entry point into the communities. The second step is to offer farmers free 5-day intensive practical and theoretical training carried out in the farmers’ communities (schools, churches) so that farmers do not have to travel far.

The training covers the following aspects:

  • Introduction into Organic Farming /Sustainable Farming
  • Introduction into Conservation Agriculture
  • Agroforestry
  • Soil and Water Conservation
  • Composting
  • Animal Husbandry and Animal Welfare
  • Spring Protection, Hygiene and Sanitation
  • Family Nutrition
  • Soya Bean Production
  • Diversity and Cropping Systems
  • Organic Top Dressers/ Integrated Pest Management
  • Leadership and Group Dynamics
  • Farmers Work Plan

After this week of training, farmers have to form farmers groups and establish a demonstration plot under the guidance of SOFD. They are given African Leafy Vegetables (ALVs) as starter seeds for their farms and demonstration plots.

Any further assistance and access to SOFDI projects /services depends on the full uptake, adoption and practice by the farmers groups. Over a period of at least one year, our professional staff and trained lead farmers regularly visit the farmers to monitor progress and to assist them in overcoming challenges. We are always at their disposal.

WE DO NOT “TOUCH AND GO” AS MANY NGOs DO. WE STAY WITH THE FARMERS AND ASSIST THEM FOR AS LONG AS THEY NEED US IN ORDER TO ENSURE A TRULY SUSTAINABLE IMPACT.

Check out Videos and Stories to see how our work is changing farmer’s lifes.

CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE – improving farmers‘ adaptability and resilience to Climate Change

THE CHALLENGE

Farmers in Kenya are experiencing widespread effects of climate change, including irregular temperatures, changes in rain patterns, and resulting periods of severe flooding and draught. These climate-related changes are significantly increasing the vulnerability of rural communities who largely depend on agriculture for their livelihood.

These communities, which are highly dependent on rain-fed crop production, are already struggling with depleted soil quality, erosion problems, the recent spread of the Fall Army Worm pest, as well as declining plot sizes due to high population density. This contributes to critically low yields, and the lack of local agronomic knowledge and limited access to affordable inputs keeps them on the brink of crisis. Climate change only exacerbates these problems and the potential for widespread disaster.   

OUR APPROACH

The goal of SOFDI is to help small-scale farmers respond to climate variability through a variety of measures and technologies that will improve their knowledge and production capacity. These strategies and farming methods will ultimately make them more resilient to withstand the potentially devastating effects of climate change and continue adapting as new patterns arise. SOFDI is working with the county government extension agencies to enhance this process of local adaptability.


“FARMERS ARE TOO POOR, THEIR SOILS TOO DEGRADED, THEIR MARKETS TOO FRAGILE. SOLUTIONS HAVE TO BE TAILORED SPECIFICALLY TO THE REALITY OF RURAL LIFE AND SOCIAL CONSIDERATIONS THAT DO NOT FAVOR BIG DEVELOPMENT BLUEPRINTS.”

(“40 CHANCES: Finding Hope in a Hungry World,” by Howard G. Buffet)

“DEVELOPMENT WILL BRING FOOD SECURITY ONLY IF IT IS PEOPLE-CENTERED, IF IT IS ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND, IF IT IS PARTICIPATORY, AND IF IT BUILDS LOCAL AND NATIONAL CAPACITY FOR SELF-RELIANCE. THESE ARE THE BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SUSTAINABLE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT.”

(James Gustave Speltz, UNDP, 1994)

Impressions

Conservation Agriculture
Millet grown with Conservation Agriculture
Some of our Lead Farmers
Before agriculture education
Typical depleted farmland before training
Practicals in the field
Explaining compost making
Pupil explaining Agriculture skills during parents visit at ACE